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Abstract

The changing patterns of comorbidities associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection, a longitudinal retrospective cohort study of Medicare patients.


Williams ND, Huser V, Rhame F, Mayer CS, Fung KW

Medicine (Baltimore). 2021;100(16):e25428. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000025428.

Abstract:

The objective of this paper is to determine the temporal trend of the association of 66 comorbidities with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection status among Medicare beneficiaries from 2000 through 2016. We harvested patient level encounter claims from a 17-year long 100% sample of Medicare records. We used the chronic conditions warehouse comorbidity flags to determine HIV infection status and presence of comorbidities. We prepared 1 data set per year for analysis. Our 17 study data sets are retrospective annualized patient level case histories where the comorbidity status reflects if the patient has ever met the comorbidity case definition from the start of the study to the analysis year. We implemented one logistic binary regression model per study year to discover the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of a comorbidity belonging to our binary classes of HIV+ or HIV– study populations. We report MLE and odds ratios by comorbidity and year. Of the 66 assessed comorbidities, 35 remained associated with HIV– across all model years, 19 remained associated with HIV+ across all model years. Three comorbidities changed association from HIV+ to HIV– and 9 comorbidities changed association from HIV– to HIV+. The prevalence of comorbidities associated with HIV infection changed over time due to clinical, social, and epidemiological reasons. Comorbidity surveillance can provide important insights into the understanding and management of HIV infection and its consequences.


Williams ND, Huser V, Rhame F, Mayer CS, Fung KW The changing patterns of comorbidities associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection, a longitudinal retrospective cohort study of Medicare patients. 
Medicine (Baltimore). 2021;100(16):e25428. doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000025428.

PMID | PMCID