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Abstract

Empirical Findings on the Role of Structured Data, Unstructured Data, and their Combination for Automatic Clinical Phenotyping.


Moldwin A, Demner-Fushman D, Goodwin TR

AMIA Summit 2021.

Abstract:

The objective of this study is to explore the role of structured and unstructured data for clinical phenotyping by determining which types of clinical phenotypes are best identified using unstructured data (e.g., clinical notes), structured data (e.g., laboratory values, vital signs), or their combination across 172 clinical phenotypes. Specifically, we used laboratory and chart measurements as well as clinical notes from the MIMIC-III critical care database and trained an LSTM using features extracted from each type of data to determine which categories of phenotypes were best identified by structured data, unstructured data, or both. We observed that textual features on their own outperformed structured features for 145 (84%) of phenotypes, and that Doc2Vec was the most effective representation of unstructured data for all phenotypes. When evaluating the impact of adding textual features to systems previously relying only on structured features, we found a statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in phenotyping performance for 51 phenotypes (primarily involving the circulatory system, injury, and poisoning), one phenotype for which textual features degraded performance (diabetes without complications), and no statistically significant change in performance with the remaining 120 phenotypes. We provide analysis on which phenotypes are best identified by each type of data and guidance on which data sources to consider for future research on phenotype identification.


Moldwin A, Demner-Fushman D, Goodwin TR Empirical Findings on the Role of Structured Data, Unstructured Data, and their Combination for Automatic Clinical Phenotyping.  
AMIA Summit 2021.

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